Beaten, blacklisted, and behind bars [electronic resource] : the vanishing space for freedom of expression in Azerbaijan / [Giorgi Gogia with contributions from Steve Swerdlow]

By: Gogia, GiorgiContributor(s): Swerdlow, Steve | Human Rights Watch [pbl]Material type: TextTextLanguage: English, Azerbaijani Publication details: New York, NY : Human Rights Watch, c2010Description: 1 online resource (90 p.)Other title: Vanishing space for freedom of expression in AzerbaijanSubject(s): Freedom of the press -- Azerbaijan | Freedom of expression -- Azerbaijan | Journalists -- Violence against -- Azerbaijan | Civil rights -- Azerbaijan | Human rights -- Azerbaijan | Tryckfrihet -- Azerbajdzjan | Yttrandefrihet -- Azerbajdzjan | Mänskliga rättigheter -- AzerbajdzjanLOC classification: KLE348.3 | .G64 2010eb onlineOther classification: Ocf-oaca.01 Online resources: Fulltext
Partial contents:
Summary & key recommendations -- Methodology -- Background -- Prosecution of journalists and human rights defenders -- Violence against journalists -- Legislative and other restrictions on freedom of the media -- International response to Azerbaijan's repression of free expression -- Extended recommendations -- Acknowledgements -- Communication with Azerbaijani government officials.
Summary: "The government of Azerbaijan is engaged in concerted efforts to limit the space for freedom of expression in the country. Senior government officials frequently pursue criminal defamation and other cases against journalists and human rights defenders criticizing the government. Dozens of journalists have been prosecuted and imprisoned or fined. Police and sometimes unidentified assailants are able to physically attack journalists and human rights defenders with impunity, deliberately interfering with their efforts to investigate human rights abuses and other issues of public interest or in retaliation for their work. Recent legislative amendments restrict journalists' ability to use video, photo or sound recording without the explicit consent of an individual even at public events. The government also banned all broadcasting of foreign radio stations on FM frequencies beginning in 2009. State antagonism toward independent and opposition media has been a serious problem in Azerbaijan for a number of years. Many journalists and editors regularly resort to self-censorship to avoid criminal prosecutions or other repercussions for critical reporting. Dozens of journalists have fled Azerbaijan in recent years fearing for their safety. These trends are particularly alarming given the upcoming November 7, 2010 parliamentary elections in Azerbaijan, as vibrant public discourse is crucial for a free and fair vote. The government of Azerbaijan should take immediate steps to abolish criminal penalties for defamation. They should conduct prompt, thorough, and impartial investigations to end impunity for violence against journalists and human rights defenders. Azerbaijan's international partners should use every opportunity to urge the Azerbaijani authorities to ensure respect for freedom of expression and to release imprisoned journalists."--P. [2] of cover.
No physical items for this record

Title from PDF title page (Human Rights Watch, viewed November 1, 2010).

"October 2010"--Table of contents page.

"This report was researched by Giorgi Gogia and Steve Swerdlow, researchers in the Europe and Central Asia division of Human Rights Watch. It was written by Giorgi Gogia with contributions from Steve Swerdlow, who wrote the legal background and parts of several other sections."--P. 70.

Summary & key recommendations -- Methodology -- Background -- Prosecution of journalists and human rights defenders -- Violence against journalists -- Legislative and other restrictions on freedom of the media -- International response to Azerbaijan's repression of free expression -- Extended recommendations -- Acknowledgements -- Communication with Azerbaijani government officials.

"The government of Azerbaijan is engaged in concerted efforts to limit the space for freedom of expression in the country. Senior government officials frequently pursue criminal defamation and other cases against journalists and human rights defenders criticizing the government. Dozens of journalists have been prosecuted and imprisoned or fined. Police and sometimes unidentified assailants are able to physically attack journalists and human rights defenders with impunity, deliberately interfering with their efforts to investigate human rights abuses and other issues of public interest or in retaliation for their work. Recent legislative amendments restrict journalists' ability to use video, photo or sound recording without the explicit consent of an individual even at public events. The government also banned all broadcasting of foreign radio stations on FM frequencies beginning in 2009. State antagonism toward independent and opposition media has been a serious problem in Azerbaijan for a number of years. Many journalists and editors regularly resort to self-censorship to avoid criminal prosecutions or other repercussions for critical reporting. Dozens of journalists have fled Azerbaijan in recent years fearing for their safety. These trends are particularly alarming given the upcoming November 7, 2010 parliamentary elections in Azerbaijan, as vibrant public discourse is crucial for a free and fair vote. The government of Azerbaijan should take immediate steps to abolish criminal penalties for defamation. They should conduct prompt, thorough, and impartial investigations to end impunity for violence against journalists and human rights defenders. Azerbaijan's international partners should use every opportunity to urge the Azerbaijani authorities to ensure respect for freedom of expression and to release imprisoned journalists."--P. [2] of cover.

Text in English with some text in Azerbaijani.

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