Actualizing human rights : global inequality, future people, and motivation / Jos Philips.

By: Philips, Joseph Pieter Mathijs, 1974-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge, 2020Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781003011569Subject(s): Human rights -- Moral and ethical aspects | Distributive justice | Environmental justice | Population -- Social aspectsLOC classification: JC571Online resources: View / Download PDF
Contents:
1. Introduction : two new challenges to human rights and the question of motivation
2. Human rights: a conception
3. Common challenges to human rights: the relativist and the political pawns challenge
4. The challenge of global inequality
5. The challenge of future people
6. The question of motivation: can people be motivated as needed for realizing human rights?
Summary: "This book argues that ultimately human rights can be actualized, in two senses. By answering important challenges to them, the real-world relevance of human rights can be brought out; and people worldwide can be motivated as needed for realizing human rights. Taking a perspective from moral and political philosophy, the book focuses on two challenges to human rights that have until now received little attention, but that need to be addressed if human rights are to remain plausible as a global ideal. Firstly, the challenge of global inequality: how, if at all, can one be sincerely committed to human rights in a structurally greatly unequal world that produces widespread inequalities of human rights protection? Secondly, the challenge of future people: how to adequately include future people in human rights, and how to set adequate priorities between the present and the future, especially in times of climate change? The book also asks whether people worldwide can be motivated to do what it takes to realize human rights. Furthermore, it considers the common and prominent challenges of relativism and of the political abuse of human rights. This book will be of key interest to scholars and students of human rights, political philosophy, and more broadly political theory, philosophy and the wider social sciences"--
List(s) this item appears in: Newly added Open Access E-Resources 2020 (WFH 2nd Sem)
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Introduction : two new challenges to human rights and the question of motivation

2. Human rights: a conception

3. Common challenges to human rights: the relativist and the political pawns challenge

4. The challenge of global inequality

5. The challenge of future people

6. The question of motivation: can people be motivated as needed for realizing human rights?

"This book argues that ultimately human rights can be actualized, in two senses. By answering important challenges to them, the real-world relevance of human rights can be brought out; and people worldwide can be motivated as needed for realizing human rights. Taking a perspective from moral and political philosophy, the book focuses on two challenges to human rights that have until now received little attention, but that need to be addressed if human rights are to remain plausible as a global ideal. Firstly, the challenge of global inequality: how, if at all, can one be sincerely committed to human rights in a structurally greatly unequal world that produces widespread inequalities of human rights protection? Secondly, the challenge of future people: how to adequately include future people in human rights, and how to set adequate priorities between the present and the future, especially in times of climate change? The book also asks whether people worldwide can be motivated to do what it takes to realize human rights. Furthermore, it considers the common and prominent challenges of relativism and of the political abuse of human rights. This book will be of key interest to scholars and students of human rights, political philosophy, and more broadly political theory, philosophy and the wider social sciences"--

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.